Writer’s Block

The worst enemy of any writer or blogger.

Writer’s block. 

How do you get rid of it? There are many ways, you just need to get inspired. But, where do I get inspiration from?, you may be asking.

Everywhere.

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Your body is thirsting for physical activity. Take a quick jog, walk your dogs, do some yoga. Just get off your butt. Trust me, physical activity can spark your inspiration. Be sure to bring your journal everywhere you go so as not to forget any ideas that may come to in a moment of inspiration.

Read. Go on, do it. Get yourself to the nearest library or bookstore, and read a book. It will help you think of ideas of your own.

Ever heard that saying that TV will rot your brain? Not if you use it for inspiration. With so much shows and movies on TV, you’re bound to find something that will spark an idea in you.

Get outside. Smell the flowers, feel the grass, bask in the sun. If it’s winter, go on, play in the snow. Nature can shed light on places in your mind you’ve never been before. It can help you uncover inspiration.

Meditate, or do yoga. It calms the body, mind, and soul. The recipe for success to finding great inspiration.

I hope this little post has helped in some way. Writer’s block is an arch-enemy to all writers, famous or not, but it can be eliminated.

Good luck to all writers!

Common Grammar Mistakes

Dear people who constantly make grammar mistakes, boy are you in luck! I must admit, I usually am not a Grammar Nazi whilst talking to my friends, but other than that, I am quite sharp grammar wise. If you, also, are a keen writer, please do your best grammar wise. No one wants to read a book that it appears it was written by a five year old.

Finally, here is, the little guide of Common Grammar Mistakes!

Probably one of the most common mistakes is the confusion between there, their, and they’re.

Here are some examples on what is correct and what is not:

Correct: There was a huge crowd at the new mall opening today!
Incorrect: Their wasn’t a lot of people that stuck around at the new mall opening, so I figured it wasn’t that great.

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Another common mistake is the confusion between its and it’s.

Let me clear this up: It’s is used as an abbreviation for it is. When you want to use it’s in a sentence, first ask yourself, will it make sense if you say it is instead of it’s?
Its shows possesion.

Correct: It’s snowing hard outside today.
Incorrect: Its so hot outside today!

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 Affect and effect. The difference?

Affect=verb

Effect=noun

Correct: The pouring rain affected me from going to the mall opening. Incorrect: The affect (should be effect) of the pouring rain last night on the new mall was tremendous, very little came.

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i.e. and e.g. 

This one is a little tricky, even for me. While e.g means for example, i.e means that is.

The following is copied from here.

Correct use of i.e. : I’m going to the place where I work best, i.e., the coffee shop.

Explanation: [There is only one place that I am claiming is best for my work. By using “i.e.”, I am telling you I am about to specify it.]

Correct use of e.g. : At the places where I work well, e.g., Starbucks, I have none of the distractions I have at home.

Explanation: [There are lots of coffee shops I like, but Starbucks is the only international one, so it’s the only “example” that would work.]

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When to use ‘me’, and when to use ‘I’


Correct use of I:

Correct: My friends and I decided not to go to the new mall opening.

Incorrect: Me and my friends went to the new mall opening.

Correct use of me:

Correct: Paul drove me and Betty to the new mall opening on Sunday. Incorrect: Paul drove me and I to the new mall opening on Sunday.

The correct use of me may be confusing, as the incorrect statement may seem correct. How to know for sure? Take away the other person in the sentence, and if it doesn’t make sense, use me.

‘Paul drove I to the new mall opening on Sunday’ does not make sense, therefore, you use ‘me’.

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Then vs. Than

Than is used as a word indicating comparison. Then is used as a word indicating time.

Correct use of than:

Correct: You are better at this than me!

Incorrect: I am so much better at this then you.

Correct use of then:

Correct: Don’t forget to close the windows, and then lock the door!

Incorrect: I won’t forget to close the windows and than lock the door. Gosh.

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It’s dragged, not drug.

 The past tense of drag is dragged. What else must I say? It is not drug.

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When to use less, and when to use fewer.

Use fewer when you can count the object, and less when you cannot (and with things like liquid).

Correct use of less:

Correct: Please use less water when you are showering next time!

Incorrect: It is practically impossible for me to use fewer water as I love to shower.

Correct use of fewer:

Correct: Only one or, at the most, two, paper towels are needed, so please use fewer.

Incorrect: How dare you order me to use less paper towels!

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I hope this mini lesson has helped you! c:

 “The greater part of the world’s troubles are due to questions of grammar.” 
― Michel de MontaigneThe Complete Essays